Are younger or older school students aged 12-17 years more likely to have used amphetamines?

Among Australian school students aged 12-17 years, methamphetamine use generally increased with age. Older students were more likely to have used methamphetamine in their lifetime and in the past year compared to younger students. Older and younger students were equally likely to have used methamphetamine in the past month.

In 2017, 1% of Australian school students aged 12 years had used methamphetamine in their lifetime; 1% in the past year; and 1% in the past month. In 2017, 1% of Australian school students aged 13 years had used methamphetamine in their lifetime; 1% in the past year; and 1% in the past month. In 2017, 2% of Australian school students aged 14 years had used methamphetamine in their lifetime; 2% in the past year; and 1% in the past month. In 2017, 2% of Australian school students aged 15 years had used methamphetamine in their lifetime; 1% in the past year; and 1% in the past month. In 2017, 3% of Australian school students aged 16 years had used methamphetamine in their lifetime; 2% in the past year; and 1% in the past month. In 2017, 3% of Australian school students aged 17 years had used methamphetamine in their lifetime; 2% in the past year; and 1% in the past month.

Source: Cancer Council Victoria (2018). ASSAD 2017 Statistics & Trends: Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco, alcohol, over-the-counter drugs, and illicit substances.

† The Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug (ASSAD) survey defines methamphetamine as speed, meth, or ice.