Methamphetamine and Young People

This section contains information about the methamphetamine use patterns of Australians who are under 18 years of age.

Given the extremely small proportion of Australian youth who use methamphetamine, there is little reliable and meaningful data about this population group available. As a result, this section presents only three FAQs, drawn from the Australian Secondary School Students’ Alcohol and Drug (ASSAD) Survey (Cancer Council Victoria, 2012).

To be consistent with the terminology used in the ASSAD survey, this section of the NADK uses the term amphetamines. ASSAD defines amphetamines as including amphetamines or speed, uppers, MDA, goey, dex, Dexie’s, dexamphetamine, ox blood, methamphetamine or ice, other than for medical reasons.

What proportion of Australian school students aged 12-17 years have used amphetamines?

The majority of Australian school students aged 12-17 years have never used amphetamines (97.1%). In the past year 2.2% of students used amphetamines, and 1.1% used in the past month.

Source: Cancer Council Victoria. (2012). Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-the-counter and illicit substances in 2011.

†Amphetamines are Central Nervous System (CNS) stimulants that increase neurotransmitter activity. Methamphetamine is a more potent form of amphetamine. The Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug (ASSAD) survey, defined amphetamines as including amphetamines or speed, uppers, MDA, goey, dex, Dexie’s, dexamphetamine, ox blood, methamphetamine or ice, other than for medical reasons.

Are male or female school students aged 12-17 years more likely to have used amphetamines?

Male school students aged 12-17 years are more likely to have used amphetamines in their lifetime, the past year, and the past month than females.

Source: Cancer Council Victoria. (2012). Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-the-counter and illicit substances in 2011.

†Amphetamines are Central Nervous System (CNS) stimulants that increase neurotransmitter activity. Methamphetamine is a more potent form of amphetamine. The Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug (ASSAD) survey, defined amphetamines as including amphetamines or speed, uppers, MDA, goey, dex, Dexie’s, dexamphetamine, ox blood, methamphetamine or ice, other than for medical reasons.

Are younger or older school students aged 12-17 years more likely to have used amphetamines?

Among Australian school students aged 12-17 years, amphetamine use increases with age. Older students are more likely to have used amphetamines in their lifetime, the past year, and the past month compared to younger students.

Source: Cancer Council Victoria. (2012). Australian secondary school students' use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-the-counter and illicit substances in 2011.

†Amphetamines are Central Nervous System (CNS) stimulants that increase neurotransmitter activity. Methamphetamine is a more potent form of amphetamine. The Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug (ASSAD) survey, defined amphetamines as including amphetamines or speed, uppers, MDA, goey, dex, Dexie’s, dexamphetamine, ox blood, methamphetamine or ice, other than for medical reasons.