Do younger and older Australians use cannabis differently?

Among Australians who used cannabis in the past 12 months, 18-24 year olds were more likely than other age groups to smoke cannabis as a joint. Those aged 30-39 years were more likely to smoke cannabis in a bong or pipe, eat it (e.g., hash cookies), or mix it with tobacco than other age groups.

78% of Australians aged 14-17 years who used cannabis in the past 12 months smoked it as a joint, 76% smoked it in a bong or pipe, 62% mixed it with tobacco, 29% ate it (e.g., hash cookies), and 5%* used it by other methods. 89% of Australians aged 18-24 years who used cannabis in the past 12 months smoked it as a joint, 72% smoked it in a bong or pipe, 60% mixed it with tobacco, 49% ate it (e.g., hash cookies), and 8% used it by other methods. 88% of Australians aged 25-29 years who used cannabis in the past 12 months smoked it as a joint, 68% smoked it in a bong or pipe, 60% mixed it with tobacco, 55% ate it (e.g., hash cookies), and 10% used it by other methods. 86% of Australians aged 30-39 years who used cannabis in the past 12 months smoked it as a joint, 83% smoked it in a bong or pipe, 65% mixed it with tobacco, 58% ate it (e.g., hash cookies), and 9% used it by other methods. 78% of Australians aged 40+ years who used cannabis in the past 12 months smoked it as a joint, 68% smoked it in a bong or pipe, 50% mixed it with tobacco, 43% ate it (e.g., hash cookies), and 6% used it by other methods. * Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages do not tally to 100% as respondents could select more than one response.

* Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.