Risky Consumption

What proportion of Australians drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Eighteen percent of Australians (aged 14 years and over) drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are men or women in Australia more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Australian men are more likely than women to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are younger or older Australians more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Australians who are very young (14-17 years) or very old (70+ years) are the least likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

* Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.

** Estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use.

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

What proportion of Australians drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury?

Approximately 14% of Australians (aged 14 years or older) drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury on a weekly basis. Twelve percent drink at these levels on a monthly basis, and 11% do so on a yearly basis. The remainder of Australians drink at low risk levels (40%) or completely abstain from alcohol (22%).

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Short-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that drinking five or more standard drinks on any single occasion significantly increases short-term risk of alcohol-related injury.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are men or women in Australia more likely to drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury?

Australian men are more likely than women to drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury on a yearly, monthly and weekly basis.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Short-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that drinking five or more standard drinks on any single occasion significantly increases short-term risk of alcohol-related injury.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are younger or older Australians more likely to drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury?

Australians aged 18-24 years are the age group most likely to drink at levels which increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury on a weekly or monthly basis. Australians aged 25-29 and 30-39 years are most likely to drink at these levels on a yearly basis.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Short-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that drinking five or more standard drinks on any single occasion significantly increases short-term risk of alcohol-related injury.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.