Do men and women in Australia die from different alcohol-caused diseases?

In general, men are more likely to die from alcohol-caused diseases than women. Both men and women are most likely to die from alcoholic liver disease, followed by mental and behavioural disorders.

Men account for 75% of alcohol-caused deaths. Of these, mental and behavioural disorders account for 17%; alcoholic liver disease accounts for 48%; accidental poisonings account for 5%; and other causes account for 5%. Women account for 25% of alcohol-caused deaths. Of these, mental and behavioural disorders account for 7%; alcoholic liver disease accounts for 16%; accidental poisonings account for 1%; and other causes account for 1%.

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). 2010 Mortality Data (ABS secondary analysis, 2013).

Please note: Percentages do not tally to 100% due to the omission of alcohol-caused diseases with very low prevalence rates.

Alcohol-Caused Disease: A disease, disorder or condition which was directly caused by the individual’s own alcohol consumption.

Diseases classified as directly caused by alcohol use include: mental and behavioural disorders due to alcohol use; alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing’s syndrome; degeneration of nervous system due to alcohol; special epileptic syndromes; alcoholic polyneuropathy; alcoholic myopathy; alcoholic cardiomyopathy; alcoholic gastritis; alcoholic liver disease; alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis; alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis; maternal care for (suspected) damage to fetus from alcohol; fetus and newborn affected by maternal use of alcohol; fetal alcohol syndrome (dysmorphic); finding of alcohol in blood; alcohol toxicity; accidental poisoning by and exposure to alcohol; intentional self-poisoning by and exposure to alcohol; poisoning by and exposure to alcohol, undetermined intent; evidence of alcohol involvement in morbidity/mortality determined by blood alcohol level; evidence of alcohol involvement in morbidity/mortality determined by level of intoxication.