In which industries are Australian employees more likely to drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury?

Australians employed in construction and mining are most likely to drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury on a weekly and monthly basis. Those employed in utilities and finance are the most likely to do so on a yearly basis.

18% of employed Australians working in agriculture abstain from alcohol; 33% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 7%* drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 21% do so on a monthly basis; and 21% do so on a weekly basis. 5%* of employed Australians working in mining abstain from alcohol; 24% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 17% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 21% do so on a monthly basis; and 33% do so on a weekly basis. 14% of employed Australians working in manufacturing abstain from alcohol; 32% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 13% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 17% do so on a monthly basis; and 24% do so on a weekly basis. 12%* of employed Australians working in utilities abstain from alcohol; 33% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 21% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 10%* do so on a monthly basis; and 24% do so on a weekly basis. 8% of employed Australians working in construction abstain from alcohol; 26% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 12% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 23% do so on a monthly basis; and 31% do so on a weekly basis. 7%* of employed Australians working in wholesale abstain from alcohol; 38% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 14% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 18% do so on a monthly basis; and 23% do so on a weekly basis. 12% of employed Australians working in retail abstain from alcohol; 43% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 10% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 19% do so on a monthly basis; and 15% do so on a weekly basis. 18% of employed Australians working in hospitality abstain from alcohol; 31% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 13% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 18% do so on a monthly basis; and 20% do so on a weekly basis. 14% of employed Australians working in transport abstain from alcohol; 36% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 12% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 16% do so on a monthly basis; and 21% do so on a weekly basis. 10% of employed Australians working in media and telecommunications abstain from alcohol; 41% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 19% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 14% do so on a monthly basis; and 16% do so on a weekly basis. 9% of employed Australians working in finance abstain from alcohol; 37% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 20% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 19% do so on a monthly basis; and 15% do so on a weekly basis. 8%* of employed Australians working in real estate abstain from alcohol; 43% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 17% drink at levels that increase short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 12%* do so on a monthly basis; and 20% do so on a weekly basis. 12% of employed Australians working in professional, technical and scientific services abstain from alcohol; 39% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 19% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 17% do so on a monthly basis; and 14% do so on a weekly basis. 12% of employed Australians working in administrative services abstain from alcohol; 42% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 17% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 12% do so on a monthly basis; and 16% do so on a weekly basis. 12% of employed Australians working in public admin and safety abstain from alcohol; 39% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 15 drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 14% do so on a monthly basis; and 20% do so on a weekly basis. 12% of employed Australians working in education and training abstain from alcohol; 51% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 15% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 10% do so on a monthly basis; and 13% do so on a weekly basis. 13% of employed Australians working in healthcare and community services abstain from alcohol; 49% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 15% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 13% do so on a monthly basis; and 10% do so on a weekly basis. 8%* of employed Australians working in arts and recreation abstain from alcohol; 41% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 19% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 14% do so on a monthly basis; and 18% do so on a weekly basis. 16% of employed Australians working in other services abstain from alcohol; 33% drink at low risk levels (4 or less drinks on a single drinking occasion); 17% drink at levels that increase their short-term risk of alcohol-related injury (5 or more drinks on a single drinking occasion) on a yearly basis; 13% do so on a monthly basis; and 21% do so on a weekly basis. * Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.

Download the data used in this chart

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Short-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Injury: An individual’s risk of experiencing alcohol-related harm on a single occasion of drinking, e.g. from alcohol-related accident or injury. Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that drinking five or more standard drinks on any single occasion significantly increases short-term risk of alcohol-related injury.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.