Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury and Employment Status

Is the employment status of Australians related to drinking at levels that increase long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Employment status is related to drinking at levels that increase long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury. Employed Australians are the group most likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury, while people who are not in the labour force are the least likely.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Employed: Self-employed or working for salary or wages.

Employment Status: Whether an individual is currently: a) employed; b) unemployed; or c) not in the labour force.

Long-Term Risk of Harm from Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Not in the Labour Force: Engaged in home duties, volunteer/charity work, student, retiree/pensioner, other.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Unemployed: Not currently working and actively seeking employment.

In which industries are Australian employees more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Australians employed in mining, construction, and utilities are the occupational groups most likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury. Those employed in healthcare and community services, and education and training are the least likely to do so.

Download the data used in this chart

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Some estimates may be unreliable due to small sample size. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Employed: Self-employed or working for salary or wages.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are employed men or women in Australia more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Employed Australian men are more likely than employed women to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Employed: Self-employed or working for salary or wages.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are younger or older Australian employees more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Employed Australians aged 18-24 years are the age group most likely to drink alcohol at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

* Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.

** Estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use.

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Employed: Self-employed or working for salary or wages.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Are unemployed men or women in Australia more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Unemployed Australian men are more likely than unemployed women to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Unemployed: Not currently working and actively seeking employment.

Are younger or older unemployed Australians more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Unemployed Australians aged 25-29 years are the age group most likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

* Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.

** Estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use.

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Unemployed: Not currently working and actively seeking employment. 

Among those not in the labour force, are men or women in Australia more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Among Australians not in the labour force, men are more likely than women to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Not in the Labour Force: Engaged in home duties, volunteer/charity work, student, retiree/pensioner, other.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.

Among those not in the labour force, are younger or older Australians more likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury?

Among those not in the labour force, Australians aged 40-49 and 60-69 years are the age groups most likely to drink at levels that increase their long-term risk of alcohol-related disease or injury.

Source: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey (NCETA secondary analysis, 2015).

* Estimate has a relative standard error of 25% to 50% and should be used with caution.

** Estimate has a relative standard error greater than 50% and is considered too unreliable for general use.

Please note: Percentages may not tally to 100% due to rounding. All measures of alcohol drinks refer to standard drinks.

Long-Term Risk of Alcohol-Related Disease or Injury: Current Australian alcohol guidelines state that long-term risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury increases when you consume an average of three or more standard drinks per day.

Not in the Labour Force: Engaged in home duties, volunteer/charity work, student, retiree/pensioner, other.

Standard Drink: A drink that contains 10 grams (or 12.5 millilitres) of alcohol.